Last edited by Nikot
Tuesday, July 28, 2020 | History

3 edition of Endothelial cell, a pluripotent control cell of the vessel wall found in the catalog.

Endothelial cell, a pluripotent control cell of the vessel wall

International Endothelial Cell Symposium (1st 1982 Paris, France)

Endothelial cell, a pluripotent control cell of the vessel wall

First International Endothelial Cell Symposium of the European Tissue Culture Society, Paris, July 15-16, 1982

by International Endothelial Cell Symposium (1st 1982 Paris, France)

  • 95 Want to read
  • 3 Currently reading

Published by Karger in Basel, New York .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Blood Vessels -- cytology.,
  • Cells, Cultured.,
  • Endothelium -- cytology.,
  • Endothelium -- physiology.

  • Edition Notes

    Statementeditors, D.G.S. Thilo-Korner and R.I. Freshney.
    ContributionsThilo-Körner, D. G. S. ed., Freshney, R. Ian, ed., European Tissue Culture Society.
    The Physical Object
    Paginationx, 206 p. :
    Number of Pages206
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL21579435M
    ISBN 103805537085

      Endothelial cells (ECs) are of great value for cell therapy, tissue engineering, and drug discovery. Obtaining high-quantity and -quality ECs remains very challenging. Here, we report a method for the scalable manufacturing of ECs from human pluripotent.   Endothelial cells play a wide variety of critical roles in the control of vascular function. Indeed, since the early s, the accumulating knowledge of the endothelial cell structure as well as of the functional properties of the endothelial cells shifted their role from a passive membrane or barrier to a complex tissue with complex functions adaptable to needs specific in time and location.

    MiRa acts as a phenotypic switch in vascular cell differentiation. Subsequent experiments demonstrated that miRa concomitantly suppressed the mRNA and protein expression of the smooth muscle cells (SMC) markers, SMA and SM22, when iPS cells were induced to differentiate towards vascular progenitor cells, by seeding the cells on Collagen IV and culturing them in DM in the . Endothelial cells (TEC3 cells) derived from mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells were used as seed cells to construct blood vessels. Tissue engineered blood vessels were made by seeding 8 smooth.

    The increasing availability of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC) derived from healthy individuals and patients have accelerated advances in developing experimental in vitro models of the vasculature: human endothelial cells (ECs), pericytes and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), can now be generated with high efficiency from hiPSC. Infusions of endothelial stem cells at high concentrations have been explored as a way to enhance blood vessel regeneration (Lovell and Mathur, , for review). Figure illustrates how infused EnPCs help to regenerate blood vessels. Figure shows that the introduction of EnPCs into the limbs of animals made ischemic by resecting a segment of femoral artery reduces the ischemia by.


Share this book
You might also like
friendly game

friendly game

The last duel in Spain

The last duel in Spain

Syncopating saxophones

Syncopating saxophones

inverted world

inverted world

Search for a nation

Search for a nation

Kite Review

Kite Review

Fly casting

Fly casting

Medicare Modernization and Prescription Drug Act of 2002 (section 942: Health professions programs regarding practice of pharmacy)

Medicare Modernization and Prescription Drug Act of 2002 (section 942: Health professions programs regarding practice of pharmacy)

Things I Do With My Friends (Little Red Readers. Level 1)

Things I Do With My Friends (Little Red Readers. Level 1)

Endothelial cell, a pluripotent control cell of the vessel wall by International Endothelial Cell Symposium (1st 1982 Paris, France) Download PDF EPUB FB2

Get this from a library. The endothelial cell: a pluripotent control cell of the vessel wall. [D G S Thilo-Körner; R Ian Freshney; European Tissue Culture Society.;].

Despite this evidence, little is known about the endothelial contribution in blood vessels of individuals with HGPS. Most HGPS studies using induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived sources focus on the cells most heavily affected by progerin toxicity, such as mesenchymal stem cells, fibroblasts, and SMCs, and bypass the study of cell types that express this protein at lower levels Cited by: 2.

For example, the damaged endothelial cells (ECs) on the vessel wall could be replaced by using EC-based therapy. The discovery of reprogramming induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells from somatic cells (1 –3) could pave the way for major advances in regenerative by:   Generating fully functional arterial endothelial cells is a critical problem for vascular development and disease research.

Currently, the arterial endothelial cells derived from human pluripotent stem cells lack the range of arterial-specific functions in vitro and the protective function for ischemic tissues in vivo.

Here, we combine single-cell RNA sequencing and CRISPR-Cas9 Cited by:   The use of human pluripotent stem cells for in vitro disease modelling and clinical applications requires protocols that convert these cells into relevant adult cell Cited by: Vascular progenitor cells have been identified from perivascular cell fractions and peripheral blood and bone marrow mononuclear fractions.

These vascular progenitors share the ability to generate some of the vascular lineages, including endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells, and pericytes. The potential therapeutic uses for vascular progenitor cells are broad and relate to stroke, ischemic.

Vascular cells derived from human pluripotent stem cells hold great potential for clinical use in the regeneration of diseased vasculature and construction of blood vessels in engineered tissue.

By deriving these cells in a controllable and clinically relevant manner harnessing physiological cues, we can obtain populations of cells amenable for. IPAH endothelial cells from microvascular origin show comparable adhesion properties to both type IV collagen and fibronectin but decreased adhesion to laminin, whereas endothelial cells derived from induced pluripotent stem cells from patients with IPAH as well as hereditary PAH PAECs show impaired adhesion to all ligands.

This highlights the. Gage et al. show that hPSC-derived venous endothelial cells are better able to upregulate markers of LSECs in vitro and in vivo compared to arterial cells. Upon intrahepatic neonatal and adult transplantation, venous progenitors engrafted, proliferated, and matured into recoverable functional hPSC-derived LSECs with characteristics similar to primary human LSECs.

Generating fully functional arterial endothelial cells is a critical problem for vascular development and disease research. Currently, the arterial endothelial cells derived from human pluripotent stem cells lack the range of arterial-specific functions in vitro and the protective function for ischemic tissues in vivo.

eration of functional cells to be used for regenerative medi-cine. For example, the damaged endothelial cells (ECs) on the vessel wall could be replaced by using EC-based therapy.

The discovery of reprogramming induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells from somatic cells (1–3) could pave the wayformajoradvances in regenerative medicine. The book discusses the endothelial growth regulation; the stimulation of vascular cell growth by macrophage products; and the control of proliferation and differentiation of endothelial cells.

The text also describes vessel wall growth control; the implications of angiogenesis in vitro for tumor biology; and the interactions and activation of.

Title(s): The endothelial cell: a pluripotent control cell of the vessel wall/ First International Endothelial Cell Symposium of the European Tissue Culture Society, Paris, July; editors, D.G.S. Thilo-Körner and R.I. Freshney. Notably, cross-sections of small arterioles showed cell-to-cell contact between the endothelial cells that formed a continuous monolayer all around the vessel wall.

Methods. Human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived endothelial cells (iECs) were cultured on a matrigel to form an iEC network. Lipids in the iEC network were investigated by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) time-of-flight.

Although we successfully generated entirely PSC-derived vascular endothelial cells, the vessel wall and the perivascular cells, which include smooth muscle cells, pericytes, and renal mesangial cells, were chimeric because those tissues can develop from both host neural crest and Flk-1 + mesoderm cells (Hirschi and Majesky,Nakamura et al.

Aims Recent ability to derive endothelial cells (ECs) from induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells holds a great therapeutic potential for personalised medicine and stem cell therapy.

The Endothelial Cell - a Pluripotent Control Cell of the Vessel Wall: 1st International Endothelial Cell Symposium of the ETCS, Paris, July by D.G.S. Thilo-KÃrner, R.I. Freshney ISBN (). The endothelium, which is at the interface between circulating blood and the vascular wall, comprises a simple squamous layer of cells that lines the inner surface of all blood vessels.

Endothelial cells are highly metabolically active and play an important role in many physiological functions, including control of vasomotor tone, blood cell. This suggests that the second sub-population of migratory cells would give rise to smooth muscle cells and cardiac fibroblasts.

In fact, further studies showed that, during coronariogenesis, endothelial cells separate earlier and organize themselves in endothelial tubes, forming the first coronary vessel cell.

6, 8 Many cell types, such as endothelial progenitor cells from blood or bone marrow, cardiac progenitor cells from the heart, mesenchymal stem cells from bone marrow and others, are currently being examined as cell sources for cardiovascular regenerative cell therapy.The formation of functional and mature Weibel-Palade bodies (WPBs), essential for endothelial cell (EC) function, in human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC)-ECs is a crucial step in the development of the full potential of hiPSC-EC for tissue regeneration, organ vascularization, and disease modeling.In this article, Malik, Rehman, and colleagues show that the histone demethylases KDM4A and KDM4C are upregulated during the differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells into vascular endothelial cells.

Depletion of these two histone demethylases suppressed endothelial differentiation and angiogenesis in vitro as well as vascular development in a zebrafish model.